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Diabetes-The Persistence of Habit Con’t

A clip from The China Study, by T. Colin Campbell:

“…“Unfortunately, misinformation and ingrained habits are wreaking havoc on our health. Our habit of eating hot dogs, hamburgers and French fries is killing us. Even Dr. James Anderson, who achieved profound results with many patients by prescribing a near-vegetarian diet, is not immune to habitual health advice. He writes, “Ideally, diets providing 70% of calories as carbohydrate and up to 70 gm fiber daily offer the greatest health benefits for individuals with diabetes. However, these diets allow only one to two ounces of meat daily and are impractical for home use for many individuals.”. Why does Professor Anderson, a very fine researcher, say that such a diet is “impractical” and thereby prejudice his listeners before they even consider the evidence?

Yes, changing your lifestyle may seem impractical. It may seem impractical to give up meat and high-fat foods, but I wonder how practical it is to be 350 pounds and have Type 2 diabetes at the age of fifteen, like the girl mentioned at the start of this chapter. I wonder how practical it is to have a lifelong condition that can’t be cured by drugs or surgery; a condition that often leads to heart disease , stroke, blindness or amputation; a condition that might require you to inject insulin into your body every day for the rest of your life.
Radically changing our diets may be “impractical,” but it might also be worth it..”

Last China Study Clip Here

THE PERSISTENCE OF HABIT

A clip from The China Study, by T. Colin Campbell

As you can see by these findings, we can beat diabetes. Two recent studies considered a combination of diet and exercise effects on this disease.
One study placed 3,234 non-diabetic people at risk for diabetes (elevated blood sugar) into three different groups. One group, the control, received standard dietary information and a drug placebo (no effect), one received the standard dietary information and the drug metformin, and a third group received “intensive” lifestyle intervention, which included a moderately low-fat diet and exercise plan to lose at least 7% of their weight. After almost three years, the lifestyle group had 58% fewer cases of diabetes than the control group. The drug group reduced the number of cases only by 31%. Compared to the control, both treatments worked, but clearly a lifestyle change is much more powerful and safer than simply taking a drug. Moreover, the lifestyle change would be effective in solving other health problems, whereas the drug would not.
The second study also found that the rate of diabetes could be reduced by 58% just by modest lifestyle changes, including exercise, weight loss and a moderately low-fat diet. Imagine what would happen if people fully adopted the healthiest diet: a whole foods, plant-based diet. I strongly suspect that virtually all Type 2 diabetes cases could be prevented.

Previous China Study clip Here

Chickpea and Spinach Curry

Tasty curry chickpeas sautéed up and served over basmati rice..yummmmmm! If you like you can serve with a dollop of plain coconut milk yogurt to balance the earthiness flavors..but I like the earthiness 😉 Enjoy! The recipe is Here

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Insulin Dosage Response to Diet

Clip from The China Study, by T.Colin Campbell
“…..“In a study of fourteen lean diabetic patients, Dr. Anderson found that diet alone could lower total cholesterol levels by 32% in just over two weeks.
These benefits, representing a decrease in blood cholesterol from 206 mg/dL to 141 mg/dL, are astounding—especially considering the speed with which they appear. Dr. Anderson also found no evidence that this cholesterol decrease was temporary as long as people continued on the diet; it remained low for four years.
Another group of scientists at the Pritikin Center achieved equally spectacular results by prescribing a low-fat, plant-based diet and exercise to a group of diabetic patients. Of forty patients on medication at the start of the program, thirty-four were able to discontinue all medication after only twenty-six days. This research group also demonstrated that the benefits of a plant-based diet will last for years if the same diet is continued.
These are examples of some very dramatic research, but they only scratch the surface of all the supporting research that has been done. One scientific paper reviewed nine publications citing the use of high-carbohydrate, high-fiber diets and two more standard-carbohydrate, high-fiber diets to treat diabetic patients. All eleven studies resulted in improved blood sugar and cholesterol levels. (Dietary fiber supplements, by the way, although beneficial, did not have same consistent effects as a change to a plant-based, whole foods diet.)…”

Previous clip of The China Study Here

NOW YOU SEE IT, NOW YOU DON’T

A clip from The China Study, by T.Colin Campbell:
…..“Like most chronic diseases, diabetes shows up more often in some parts of the world than in others. This has been known for a hundred years. It has also been well documented that those populations with low rates of diabetes eat different diets than those populations with high rates of diabetes. But is that just a coincidence, or is there something else at work?

The Seventh-day Adventists population is a good example. They are an interesting group of people to study because of their dietary habits: their religion encourages them to stay away from meat, fish, eggs, coffee, alcohol and tobacco. As a result, half of them are vegetarian. But 90% of these vegetarians still consume dairy and/or egg products, thus deriving a significant amount of their calories from animal sources. It should also be noted that the meat-eating Adventists are not the meatiest of eaters. They consume about three servings of beef a week, and less than one serving a week of fish and poultry.
In dietary studies involving the Adventists, scientists compare “moderate” vegetarians to “moderate” meat eaters. This is not a big difference. Even so, the Adventist vegetarians are much healthier than their meat eating counterparts. Those Adventists that “deprived” themselves of meat also “deprived” themselves of the ravages of diabetes. Compared to the meat eaters, the vegetarians had about one-half the rate of diabetes. They also had almost half the rate of obesity.

Studies:
• Researchers found that increased fat intake was associated with an increased rate of Type 2 diabetes among 1,300 people in the San Luis valley in Colorado. They said, “The findings support the hypothesis that high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets are associated with the onset of non-insulin-dependent [Type 2] diabetes mellitus in humans.
• In the past twenty-five years, the rate at which children in Japan contract Type 2 diabetes has more than tripled. Researchers note that consumption of animal protein and animal fat has drastically increased in the past fifty years. Researchers say that this dietary shift, along with low exercise levels, might be to blame for this explosion of diabetes.
• In England and Wales the rate of diabetes markedly dropped from 1940 to 1950, largely during World War II when food consumption patterns changed markedly. During the war and its aftermath, fiber and grain intake went up and fat intake went down. People ate “lower” on the food chain because of national necessity. Around 1950, though, people gave up the grain-based diets and returned to eating more fat, more sugar and less fiber. Sure enough, diabetes rates started going up.
• Researchers studied 36,000 women in Iowa for six years. All were free of diabetes at the start of the study, but more than 1,100 cases of diabetes developed after six years. The women who were least likely to get diabetes were those that ate the most whole grains and fiber—those whose diets contained the most carbohydrates (the complex kind found in whole foods).

All of these findings support the idea that both across and within populations, high-fiber, whole, plant-based foods protect against diabetes, and high-fat, high-protein, animal-based foods promote diabetes.”

Previous China Study clip Here

Chickpeas in Curried Coconut Broth

Oh My….

Chickpeas in Curried Coconut Broth

Chickpeas in Curried Coconut Broth

All I can say is YUM…soooooo good!

The Recipe is Here 😉

Why This Will Work For You-Part II

A clip from The China Study, by T.Colin Campbell

“…Those who follow a whole foods, low-fat, plant-based diet consume fewer calories.  It’s not because they’re starving themselves.  In fact, they will likely spend more time eating and eat a larger volume of food than their meat-eating counterparts.  That’s because these whole foods are much less energy-dense than animal foods and added fats.  There are fewer calories in each spoonful or cupful of these foods.  Fat has 9 calories/gram while carbohydrates and protein have only 4 calories/gram.  In addition whole foods have a lot of fiber, which makes you feel full, and yet contributes almost no calories to your meal.  So by eating a healthy meal, you may reduce the calories that you consume, digest and absorb, even if you eat significantly more food.

This idea on its own, however, is not yet a sufficient explanation for the benefits of a whole foods, plant-based diet.  Other studies play a crucial part in explaining the health benefits of a whole foods, plant-based diet, studies show that the weight-loss effect is due to more than simple calorie restriction…”

To Be Continued..

More China Study Clips Here